Register and pay for your programs online, or download a printable
registration form
and mail it to the Museum with your payment.

January
13th Annual Connecticut Kids Fair, Saturday, January 28 & Sunday, January 29

February
Teale Lecture: The Sixth Extinction, Thursday, February 2
Molecular Plant Remains at Archaeological Sites, Saturday, February 11
A Sea Vegetable Saga, Sunday, February 19
36th Connecticut Flower & Garden Show, Thursday, February 23- Sunday, February 26

March
Look Up! It's the Winter Milky Way! Friday, March 3
Bone Identification, Saturday, March 11
Scientific Illustration-Insects! Saturday, March 18
An Archaeologist's View of Life in Seventeenth-Century Maine, Saturday, March 25
Teale Lecture: Building Capacity for Adapting to Climate Change, Thursday, March 30

April
Day Trip- Plimoth Plantation, Saturday, April 15
Teale Lecture: The Nile Project: Musical and Cultural Performance
Exploring Connecticut's Towns-Whitneyville! Saturday, April 22
People and Oceans: From Robust Frontiers to Fragile Environments, Saturday, April 29
Army Ant Guest Exhibit Public Opening, Sunday, April 30, 2017

May
Management of Timber Rattlesnakes in New England, Saturday, May 13



Community Event: 13th Annual Connecticut Kids Fair
Saturday, January 28 & Sunday, January 29 - Connecticut Convention Center, Hartford

Visit the Museum and Archaeology Center's booth at the Connecticut Kids Fair to learn something new about our natural and cultural history! The fair will have many hands-on family activities and educational exhibits. You will find fun, entertainment, displays, and more at the Connecticut Kids Fair. For information, times, and directions visit: jenksproductions.com/kidsfair.html

Teale Lecture: The Sixth Extinction
Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist
Thursday, February 2, 4 pm - Konover Auditorium, Dodd Research Center, UConn
No registration required - FREE

Over the last half-billion years there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us. Elizabeth Kolbert tells us why and how human beings have altered life on the planet in a way no species has before. Interweaving research in half a dozen disciplines, descriptions of the fascinating species that have already been lost, and the history of extinction as a concept, Kolbert provides a moving and comprehensive account of the disappearances occurring before our very eyes. She shows that the sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy, compelling us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.

Elizabeth Kolbert is a staff writer for The New Yorker and won the Pulitzer for The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History and Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man, Nature, and Climate Change in 2015. Her series on global warming, The Climate of Man, won the American Association for the Advancement of Science's magazine writing award and a National Academies communications award. She is a two-time National Magazine Award winner. She is also a recipient of a Heinz Award and Guggenheim Fellowship.

Presented by UConn's Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series-bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://lib.uconn.edu/about/events/tealelectures/




Molecular Plant Remains at Archaeological Sites
Alexander Brittingham, Department of Anthropology, UConn
Saturday, February 11, 1 pm- Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn
No registration required - FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Molecular plant remains have played an increasingly important role in helping archaeologists explore the past. When analyzed, these remains allow us to reconstruct past climates and, when combined with archaeological data, researchers can determine how hunter-gatherers interacted with their environments. Join Alexander Brittingham and learn about his work with extract molecular plant remains from sediments at Paleolithic archaeological sites in Armenia, and what his research can inform us about the past.



A Sea Vegetable Saga
Anoushka Concepcion, Connecticut Sea Grant and Cooperative Extension, UConn
Sunday, February 19, 1 pm - Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn
No registration required - FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Interest in sea vegetables is increasing for both their nutritional and environmental benefits. While the majority of products meant for human consumption are imported, efforts are underway to support domestic production of sea vegetables for food. Sea Grant has supported nearly 30 years of research on the cultivation of local, native species and is now helping interested aquaculture businesses apply the research findings to grow new sea vegetable products in Connecticut and beyond. Join Anoushka Concepcion, Assistant Extension Educator in Marine Aquaculture, who will tell the story of why sea vegetables and their cultivation has become popular in recent years and the industry's current status.

Community Event: 36th Connecticut Flower and Garden Show
Thursday, February 23- Sunday, February 26 - Connecticut Convention Center, Hartford

Escape the winter elements and explore over 300 booths overflowing with fresh flowers, plants, herbs, bulbs, seeds, gardening books, and accessories. Visit the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History's Ethnobotany exhibit in the Federated Garden Club's section of the show. The Federated Garden Club section will feature a design and horticulture competition, demonstrations, and educational displays. For information, times, and directions visit the Connecticut Flower and Garden Show at www.ctflowershow.com.



Field Activity: Look Up! It's the Winter Milky Way!
Dr. Cynthia Peterson, Physics, UConn
Friday, March 3, 7:30 pm - UConn. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum Members and Donors)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Explore winter's night sky during this visit to UConn's historic planetarium. Learn how to identify the stars, planets, and other celestial objects observable throughout the season. Astronomy Professor Dr. Cynthia Peterson will offer a general orientation to the constellations, planets, and special celestial objects visible in the night sky using binoculars.

She will also discuss the upcoming total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017, the first time in four decades that the moon's shadow will cross the lower 48 states! Weather and time permitting, the session will conclude at the Observatory to use binoculars and telescopes to observe a gorgeous quarter moon and possibly Venus and Mars. We will also look at celestial objects like globular clusters, open clusters, and possible comets.


Museum Workshop: Bone Identification
Dr. Sarah Sportman, Archaeological and Historical Services, Inc.
Saturday, March 11, 10 am - UConn. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $30 ($25 for Museum Members and Donors)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Zooarchaeology is the study of animal (faunal) remains from archaeological sites. The analysis of animal bones can provide archaeologists with information about human diets, behaviors, economic strategies, and archaeological site formation processes. In this workshop you will learn about the ways archaeologists use animal remains to study the past, how to recognize faunal remains in the field, how to identify bone modification marks (e.g., burning, butchery, gnawing, weathering), as well as the basics of animal bone identification. We will use real comparative skeletal material to examine the differences between different classes of animals (mammals, birds, and fish) and body parts and we will study the bones of some of the animals commonly recovered from archaeological sites in New England.



Scientific Illustration-Insects!
Virge Kask, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UConn
Saturday, March 18, 10 am to 12 noon - UConn. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $25 ($20 for Museum Members and Donors)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Whether beautiful or creepy, colorful or camouflaged, living in the soil or fluttering across the sky, insects are intriguing subjects for artists. Join Virge Kask, Scientific Illustrator in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UConn, for the Museum's scientific illustration workshop. Look closely at a variety of insects using microscopes, and the naked eye, to examine their anatomy in detail. Ms. Kask will teach the best techniques for conveying the essence of these captivating creatures using pencil and paper, and provide tips for drawing from mounts and live subjects. You will receive a folder with information about scientific illustration and supplies for making your illustrations in the classroom.

Special Event: An Archaeologist's View of Life in Seventeenth-Century Maine
Dr. Emerson "Tad" Baker, Salem State University
Saturday, March 25, 2 pm - Farmington High School, 10 Monteith Drive, Farmington, CT
$10 general admission; $5 for students with ID. Current FOSA, ASC, Museum of Natural History members, and Farmington students and faculty admitted free with ID.

Drawing upon his excavations at many seventeenth-century archaeology sites, Baker will explore the material world of the early settlers of New England. It is a story about encounters between people from different cultures, living in uncertain times, as well as the power of the place they lived, with its rich natural resources such as furs, fish, and lumber. Excavations have revealed the remains of their homes - from modest homes, to substantial longhouses and fortified complexes. Baker will focus in part on the Chadbourne Site (ca. 1643-1690) in South Berwick, Maine, where thirteen seasons of excavations revealed over 40,000 artifacts, including saw mill hardware, a range of tools, and many luxury items imported by the Chadbournes, the wealthy merchants who owned the property.

Emerson "Tad" Baker is a professor of History and former dean of the Graduate School at Salem State University. He is the award-winning author of many works on the history and archaeology of early New England, including The Devil of Great Island: Witchcraft and Conflict in Early New England, and most recently A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience. He has been an advisor for PBS-TV's The American Experience, and an on-camera expert for the PBS series Colonial House. He is a member of the Gallows Hill Team who recently confirmed the execution site of the Salem witch trials, work that Archaeology magazine just named as one of its top ten discoveries of 2016.

This event is part of the annual meeting of the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology that begins at 1 pm and is open to the public. The Friends of the Office of State Archaeology, the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center at UConn, and Archaeological Society of Connecticut (ASC) sponsor the presentation. Snow Date: Sunday, March 26.



Teale Lecture: Building Capacity for Adapting to Climate Change
Dr. Maria Carmen Lemos, Professor and Associate Dean for Research
School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan
Thursday, March 30, 4 pm - Konover Auditorium, Dodd Research Center, UConn
No registration required - FREE

Around the world, devastation of climate-related impacts has undermined livelihoods, threatened ecosystems, and stretched the capacity of sociopolitical institutions. Droughts, storms, and floods have often caused serious agricultural losses and human suffering: images of famines in Africa, human displacement in the Caribbean, and water-covered settlements in Bangladesh illustrate just some of the disastrous impacts of climate on vulnerable populations. In recent years, the possibility of more frequent and extreme events as a result of climate change has fueled new avenues of inquiry to understand and address the vulnerability of human and social systems to these events. As adaptation becomes prominent on the social and governmental agendas of both rich and poor countries, we need to understand better the factors that increase or constrain their adaptive capacity (AC), or the ability of different systems and agents to respond and recover from climate impact. Such an improved understanding is particularly important for less developed regions where these negative impacts will likely interact with and exacerbate both existing vulnerabilities and development measures design to address them. This talk focuses on this intersection in Northeast Brazil, where in the wake of a national anti-poverty program, a recent drought has exposed the difficult relationship between poverty and vulnerability.

Presented by UConn's Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series-bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://lib.uconn.edu/about/events/tealelectures/

Day Trip- Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, MA
Saturday, April 15 - Departing from UConn Storrs Campus
Advance registration required: $85 ($75 for Museum Members and Donors). Includes
bus fee, Plimoth Plantation admission, and the "Eat Like a Pilgrim" meal.
Adults and children ages 6 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Plimoth Plantation offers personal encounters with history built on thorough research about the Wampanoag People and the Colonial English community in the 1600s. As we travel to Plymouth from UConn, Connecticut State Archaeologist Brian Jones will discuss recent finds relating to 17th century life in Connecticut. When we arrive, explore the plantations permanent exhibits tell the complex and interwoven stories of two distinct cultures - English and Native. Exhibits at the plantation includes the English Village, the Wampanoag Homesite, the Hornblower Visitor Center, the Craft Center, and the Maxwell and Nye Barns.

For lunch we will learn 17th-century table manners at the "Eat Like a Pilgrim" activity where we will don napkins, eat without a fork, and discover how Myles Standish ate his porridge. The typical menu usually includes turkey, stewed pompion, indian pudding, cucumber sallet, chargers of cheese and fruit, cheate bread, and apple cider. A Plimoth Plantation Culinary Historian will be on hand providing commentary and interpretation of the meal.

After lunch we will get back on the bus and travel to Plymouth's historic waterfront. There you can explore Leyden Street, Cole's Hill, Brewster Gardens, Town Square, and see Plymouth Rock.

The bus will leave Storrs at 8 am. The bus will depart Plymouth for UConn at 4:30 pm. Please arrive and be prepared to board the bus prior to departure times. For a preview visit the Plymouth Plantation website: https://www.plimoth.org



Teale Lecture: The Nile Project: Musical and Cultural Performance
Founded in 2011 by Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis and Ethiopian-American singer Meklit Hadero, the Nile Project is one of the tightest cross-cultural musical collaborations in history. Working to raise awareness of the entire Nile River basin as an ecosystem, the 27- member Nile Project collective hail from all along the great river that connects 11 countries and over 400 million people-a region that has been marred by political and ecological conflicts-from its sources beyond Lake Victoria to its delta in Egypt.

Presentation and Discussion
Mina Girgis, President and CEO of the Nile Project
Wednesday, April 19, 4 pm - Konover Auditorium, Dodd Research Center, UConn??
No registration required - FREE

Artistic Performance
Thursday, April 20, 7:30 pm - Jorgensen Auditorium, 2132 Hillside Road, UConn
Performance tickets can be purchased at http://jorgensen.uconn.edu/events/view.php?id=550

Major support provided by Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts. The Edwin Way Teale Lecture Series-bringing leading scholars and scientists to the University of Connecticut to present public lectures on nature and the environment. 860.486.4460 - http://lib.uconn.edu/about/events/tealelectures/.


Special Series: Exploring Connecticut's Towns-Whitneyville!
Eric D. Lehman, Author and Hamden Historical Society Vice President
Saturday, April 22, 11 am to 1 pm - Hamden, CT. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum Members and Donors)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The natural and cultural history of Connecticut, in each of its 169 towns, has a unique story to tell. From the indigenous peoples arriving after the glaciers receded and the European explorers and settlers establishing colonies in the "New World," to the innovators of the industrial revolution leading to the present day, Connecticut is steeped in history. Join us as we explore Connecticut's towns and learn about the people and places that have shaped and continue to shape the Constitution State.

In 1640, nestled below the cliffs of East Rock in what was the Colonial Colony of New Haven, William Flowler constructed a gristmill. The mill later harbored Edward Whalley and William Gofee who were wanted by the English government for the regicide of Charles I of England. The mill burned in 1662, was rebuilt, and remained in use until inventor Eli Whitney bought it in 1798. He built his fabled Armory here, manufacturing rifles for the United States Military. Whitney combined interchangeable parts, division of labor, machine tools, and modern accounting techniques in a way no one in the world had done up to that time. Now it's the location of the Eli Whitney Museum in the heart of Hamden's historic Whitneyville neighborhood.

Eli Whitney and his son helped build both Hamden and America, and their legacy of innovation and hard work is one that continues to astonish and inspire today. Today, the neighborhood is home to a wide variety historic wonders that tell the story of America's colonial, industrial, and natural history. 



People and Oceans: From Robust Frontiers to Fragile Environments
Dr. Helen Rozwadowski, History and Maritime Studies, UConn
Saturday, April 29, 1 pm - Storrs Hall, Room 011, UConn
No registration required - FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The Second World War involved unprecedented scientific investigation of the ocean to support undersea warfare, amphibious landings and sea-based aviation. In the wake of hostilities, the ocean emerged as a promising site for science and technology-based economic development. Inventors, entrepreneurs and officials transferred the metaphor of the American western frontier onto the sea to express their optimism for the growth potential for ocean-based industry. The scramble to claim oceanic resources led to the erosion of the centuries-long agreement regarding freedom of the seas. The 1970s concern for the great whales and the dangers posed by major oil spills drew attention seaward but did not translate into worry about the ocean itself immediately. Over time, the accessible ocean, increasingly made visible through television and movies and direct mass experience, began a process of cultural transformation from robust frontier to fragile environment. Concern for the ocean ecosystem gained traction only recently, with the belated awareness of overfishing and climate change.

The time to write ocean history is now. Recent scholarship from many fields has laid a promising foundation, revealing the underappreciated importance of the ocean and its depths in both the past and the present.

Presented by UConn's Department of History with the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center at UConn

Army Ant Guest Exhibit Public Opening
Sunday, April 30, 2017
Biology/Physics Building Lobby, UConn

Explore the complex biology between army ants and their hundreds of associated guests in this the new exhibit presented by the Biological Research Collections, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Connecticut State Museum of Natural History. The exhibit is part of UConn's Ant U endeavor designed to involve a variety of academic disciplines to engage a broad audience in the wonders of the complex biological systems of army ants and their associated species.

It is a project borne out of an award from the National Science Foundation's Collections in Support of Biological Research program to UConn's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, in partnership with the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History to preserve and curate the Carl W. and Marian E. Rettenmeyer Army Ant Guest Collection. This world-class collection of over 2 million army ants and their guests is the result of 50 years of careful, detailed fieldwork in Central and South America by the Rettenmeyers. For additional information, visit http://antu.uconn.edu or email AntUinfo@uconn.edu


Management of Timber Rattlesnakes in New England:
Perceptions and Attitudes of Connecticut Residents

Lindsay Keener-Eck and Dr. Anita Morzillo, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, UConn
Saturday, May 13, 1 pm - Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn
No registration required - FREE
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) are endangered in most New England states. Yet, there is little knowledge about resident interactions with this species, and how timber rattlesnakes are perceived by the public. Such information is important for guiding management strategies for the species and associated public outreach efforts. Recent research at UConn involved examining Connecticut resident attitudes toward timber rattlesnakes. Graduate student Lindsay Keener-Eck and Assistant Professor Dr. Anita Morzillo from the UConn Department of Natural Resources and the Environment will discuss findings from this research.

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