Register and pay for your programs online, or download a printable
registration form and mail it to the Museum with your payment.

June
Special Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Lebanon! Saturday, June 3
Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday, Sunday, June 18
Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Stories of the Voyage of the Beagle, Saturday, June 24
Archaeology Field School for Kids, Monday, June 26 through Friday, June 30

July
Field Activity: Expert Guided Nature Hike, Saturday, July 8
Archaeology Field School for Educators, Monday, July 10 through Friday, July 14
Day Trip: Historic Salem, MA, Saturday, July 15
Astronomy for Kids: The Great Solar Eclipse of 2017, Friday, July 21
Scientific Illustration—Flora and the Pollinators of Summer, Saturday, July 22
Special UConn Bug Week Event, Saturday, July 29

August
CSMNH Archaeology Field School for Adults, Monday, July 31 through Friday, August 4
Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Family First and Foremost, Saturday, August 12
Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems, Thursday, August 17
Germ Safari: The Wild Microscopic World in Your Backyard, Saturday, August 19



Special Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Lebanon!
Saturday, June 3, 10 am to 11:30 – Lebanon, CT. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum Members and Donors)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The natural and cultural history of Connecticut, in each of its 169 towns, has a unique story to tell. From the indigenous peoples arriving after the glaciers receded and the European explorers and settlers establishing colonies in the “New World,” to the innovators of the industrial revolution leading to the present day, Connecticut is steeped in history. Join us as we explore Connecticut’s towns and learn about the people and places that have shaped and continue to shape the Constitution State.

The area of Poquechaneed was originally settled by the Mohegan Indians and used primarily for hunting. Mohegan sachem Uncas began selling parts of for this land on what would become Lebanon to settlers from Norwich in 1663. The General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut incorporated the town on October 10, 1700. 

While a prosperous farming community developed during the colonial period, Lebanon reached its greatest importance during the American Revolution. Governor Jonathan Trumbull, a resident and only British colonial governor to side with the rebel forces during the Revolution, used a store house on his property for meetings of the Council of Safety, directing Connecticut’s war effort. The importance of the Trumbull family and Lebanon earned the town the nickname "Heartbeat of the Revolution."

In the years following the Revolution, other eastern Connecticut towns thrived as mills and factories were built to take advantage of abundant water power. In Lebanon the focus remained agricultural, which continues today.

The tour will focus on Lebanon's celebrated mile long Green, highlighting historic buildings and town lore. The walk will conclude with admission to the Lebanon Museum. It’s exhibit begins with the last glacier period and a local Paleo-Indian site, then moves through the land grants of 1650 to 1700, incorporation in 1700, the American Revolution, 19th century agriculture, the early 20th century influx of European immigrants, and historic preservation.



Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday
Sunday, June 18, 10 am to 4 pm – Elizabeth Park, Hartford, CT

Stop by and visit the Museum and Archaeology Center at the Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday and learn about natural and cultural history through our ethnobotany exhibit! This event celebrates the park's 15,000 blooming roses in America's oldest municipal rose garden. Explore the world famous rose garden, a two and a half acre park that has about 800 varieties of roses. There will be a number of cultural, arts, and heritage organizations participating as well as performing arts and children's activities! For more information and directions visit http://elizabethparkct.org.


Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Stories of the Voyage of the Beagle
Saturday, June 24, 10 am
– Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

For almost five years, Charles Darwin sailed on the HMS Beagle as its naturalist and as the companion to its captain Robert Fitzroy. He left Plymouth dockyard a naïve 22-year-old, not yet a “finished naturalist” according to his mentor John Henslow. Despite nearly constant sea sickness, a month-long fever that nearly killed him, and bouts of home sickness, he proved to be a sturdy sailor. He took many tracks inland across South America, exploring jungles, climbing the Andes, observing human cultures, and riding with the gauchos on the pampas. He saw the Islands of the South Pacific, and toured Australia and South Africa. On these journeys, he collected specimens and thought deeply about the patterns of life, patterns that shaped his thoughts of evolution. Travel with him in this presentation as he recounts stories of his journeys and his life at sea aboard the Beagle.



Archaeology Field School for Kids
Monday, June 26 through Friday, June 30, 9 am to 12 noon UConn, Storrs
Advance registration required: $225 ($200 for Museum Members and Donors)
Grades 5 through 10.

Do you like uncovering evidence to solve mysteries? Do you like getting your hands dirty exploring the outdoors? Spend a week with UConn archaeologists exploring the world of field archaeology. You will learn about the science, tools, and methods used by genuine archaeologists and be part of a real archaeological field crew. Participants will be doing hands-on fieldwork and laboratory research at a professional, ongoing archaeological dig. We have been opening new areas of our on-campus dig site each year, and every session we uncover something new!



Field Activity: Expert Guided Nature Hike
Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, July 8, 9 am to 11 am – Pomfret, CT
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Summer is an exciting time to explore various habitats fond on preserved lands in Connecticut’s “Quiet Corner”. Join naturalist and science educator Paula Coughlin for a morning walk through grasslands, forests, and wetlands as we look for signs of wildlife. Wear good walking or hiking shoes and dress for the weather and ticks. It helps to wear a hat and tuck your pant legs into tall socks when hiking.

Archaeology Field School for Educators
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, July 10 through Friday, July 14, 9 am to 3 pm, Windsor, CT
Advance registration required: $45

Educators will spend a week doing hands-on archaeology at the Archaeology Field School for Educators sponsored by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Office of State Archaeology. This field school is designed to give educators who teach history or social science in a classroom or museum setting a deeper appreciation of the importance of archaeology as a tool for learning about Connecticut’s fascinating past. The field school will cover the basics of field methods, paperwork, data management, and artifact identification. Learning proper archaeological methods will develop the participant’s understanding of the ethical aspects of archaeology and the archaeologist’s responsibility to preserve the data they retrieve so that it will remain valuable to future researchers. These lessons provide a first step toward developing the skills needed to undertake your own archaeological investigations with students. 

Participants will experience an authentic and significant archaeological investigation, working with primary sources at a historic site in Windsor, Connecticut. They will also learn about the role of the Connecticut Office of State Archaeology and how it can be an important resource in developing archeological lessons and activities for students. Space is limited. To request a registration form please contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.

Day Trip: Historic Salem, MA
Saturday, July 15 – Departing from UConn Storrs Campus
Advance registration required: Bus Fee $55 ($45 for Members and Donors).
All ages welcome.

From its notable past, to its unique present, the historic port city of Salem Massachusetts is an exciting place to visit. The town has numerous museums and historic sites, including the Peabody Essex Museum, House of the Seven Gables, Old Burying Point Cemetery, and the Salem Witch Trials Memorial to name a few. Salem also has a beautiful waterfront to explore as well as a bustling downtown district with galleries, shops, and restaurants.

The bus will leave Storrs at 8 am. The bus will depart Salem for UConn at 5 pm. Please arrive and be prepared to board the bus prior to departure times. Admission to the museums, historic sites, and other activities are not included. For a preview of attractions and activities visit http://salem.org.



Astronomy for Kids: The Great Solar Eclipse of 2017
Dr. Cynthia Peterson, Physics, UConn
Friday, July 21, 9 am to 12 noon – UConn. Directions will be sent to participants.
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum Members and Donors)
Grades 5 through 10

Why all the excitement about the coming total solar eclipse on August 21st? Visit UConn's Historic Planetarium and learn about the moon shadow tracking across the lower 48 states for the first time in four decades. We'll discuss the geometry of eclipses, show slides from earlier total solar eclipses, and explore cultural relevance of the event in today's world. After a snack break we will basic a star finder, and talk about the many special celestial events you'll see in August along the eclipse canter line.

Weather permitting, participants with their parents are welcome to return Friday night for a session at the UConn Observatory to observe celestial objects like globular clusters, open clusters, and any comets that happen to be wandering by.


Scientific Illustration—Flora and the Pollinators of Summer
Virge Kask, Biological Sciences, UConn
Saturday, July 22, 10 am to 12 noon – UConn Storrs
Advance registration required: $25 ($20 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The summer offers artists and illustrators amazing flora and related pollinators to explore. Join Virge Kask, Scientific Illustrator with UConn’s Biological Sciences, for a summer edition of the Museum’s scientific illustration workshop. Scientific illustrators work with a specimen to compose an idealized and accurate view that cannot be captured in a photograph. In this workshop, participants will look closely at a variety of flora material found in the summer to examine their composition in detail. Then, Ms. Kask will teach the best techniques to convey the essence of their form using pencil and paper. You will receive a folder with information about scientific illustration and supplies for making your own illustrations in the classroom.

Special UConn Bug Week Event
Department of Extension, UConn
Saturday, July 29, 10 am to 1 pm – Tolland County Extension Center, Vernon, CT

Discover the wonderful world of bugs at this UConn Bug Week event. There will be live insect specimens, expert led walks, visits to the pollinator and butterfly garden as well as the woods. Stop by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History’s table to see a variety of insect specimens from its natural history collection. For additional Bug Week information visit http://bugs.uconn.edu



CSMNH Archaeology Field School for Adults
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, July 31 through Friday, August 4, 9 am to 3 pm – Glastonbury, CT
Advance registration required: $200 ($150 for Members & Donors)
Adults and teens ages 16+

Spend a week learning about archaeology at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center’s Field School! This field school will cover the ethical aspects of archaeology, as well as proper archaeological field techniques and data management. As a member of this program, you will have the opportunity to participate in an official Connecticut Office of State Archaeology dig. The dig will take place at a recently discovered and very significant site dating to the mid to late 1600s. Your findings will add important information to our understanding of Connecticut’s rich historic past!


Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Family First and Foremost
Saturday, August 12, 10 am
– Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Family was very important to Charles Darwin. Raised by his sisters after his mother died when he was 8 years old, he came to rely on their council. His father was very proper and was concerned that Charles needed to show more interest in his future. Ultimately, though, he was a caring father who Charles admired with fondness. In his wife, Emma, Charles found true love, respect, and devotion. She was his helpmate through his chronic illnesses and his partner in social affairs and caring for their children. Their parenting style was rather liberal for their time. Charles’ greatest anxiety was the effect of his work on Emma, who was very concerned about his increasing distance from her religious beliefs. The death of their 10-year-old daughter Anne was a soul-crushing tragedy for Charles and Emma, but they supported one another through it and remained strongly committed to their other children throughout their lives. This presentation will share their family’s stories to sketch a picture of life with the Darwins.

Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems
Meigs Point Nature Center Staff, Hammonasset State Park
Thursday, August 17, 10 am to 11:30 am, rain or shine - Madison, CT
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members) All ages are welcome. Parking fees are not included.

Explore the ecosystems of Connecticut’s coast at Hammonasset State Park. Adjacent to Long Island Sound, in the shoreline town of Madison, the ecosystems of Hammonasset are swimming with life. From its sandy beach and rocky shore, to its salt marshes, Connecticut’s largest shoreline park is not only popular with beach-goers, but also a diverse collection of plants and animals that call this shoreline environment home. Join the Meigs Point Nature Center Staff and discover the characteristics of three ecosystems found at Hammonasset State Park.


Germ Safari: Discover the Wild Microscopic World in Your Backyard
Dr. Spencer Nyholm, Andrea Suria, and Michael Stephens,
Molecular and Cell Biology, UConn
Saturday, August 19, 10 am to 12 noon – UConn, Storrs
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Everywhere you look in your backyard, as far as the eye can see, life abounds. Much of this is obvious—plants and trees, insects and birds, turtles and snakes, and mammals—yet, just beyond the eye’s ability to see, there is a hidden world of living things thriving. This is the world of the microbes and they are everywhere. Join a team of microbiology researchers from UConn’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology in this exploration of microbial life. Collect samples from the soil and ponds around campus with a team of UConn Molecular and Cell Biology scientists. Then, learn to use laboratory techniques to examine the microbes lurking in these samples and all around us. The researchers will discuss the importance of these microbes for the environment and how we all depend on their presence.

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