To register for programs, please print and return our Summer 2014
Registration Form
. If you would like to be added to our mailing list
to receive a printed copy of our program, please email us here
or call 860-486-4460.

May
Museum Lecture: Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples, Saturday, May 17
Field Activity: Birds of Bafflin Sanctuary, Saturday, May 31

June
Field Activity: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Durham! Saturday, June 14
Community Event: Rose Sunday, Sunday, June 15
Member Event: Special Connecticut River & Historic House Tour, Saturday, June 21
Field Activity: What We Can Learn from Old Gravestones, Saturday, June 28
KASET: Marine Explorers 1, Monday, June 30 - Wednesday, July 2

July
KASET: Marine Explorers 2, Monday, July 7 - Wednesday,  July 9
KASET: Space Astronomy, Monday, July 7 - Friday, July 11
KASET: Archaeology Field School for Kids, Monday, July 7 - Friday, July 11
Day Trip: Brooklyn Botanic Garden & Brooklyn Museum, Saturday, July 12
Workshop: Personal Fieldnotes: Documenting the World Around You, Saturday, July 19
KASET: Magnificent Microbes, Monday, July 21 - Friday, July 25
Project O—Fun in the Lab and On the Sea! Saturday, July 26

August
Museum Lecture: Asian Longhorn Beetles & Emerald Ash Borers, Saturday, August 2
CSMNH Adult Archaeology Field School, Monday, August 4 - Friday, August  8
Field Activity: Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems, Thursday, August 14
High Tech Treasure Hunting: Fun with GPS and Geocaching, Saturday, August 23

October
Special Trip: Meadowcroft Rockshelter, Friday, October 10 - Sunday, October 12



Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples 

Dr. Lucianne Lavin, Director of Research and Collections,
Institute for American Indian Studies
Saturday, May 17, 3 pm

Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs

No registration required – FREE

Adults and children ages 14 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.



More than 10,000 years ago, people settled on lands that now lie within the boundaries of the state of Connecticut. Leaving no written records and scarce archaeological remains, these peoples and their communities have remained unknown to all but a few archaeologists and other scholars. How do we know anything about these ancient people? What are the clues and discoveries that tell the story of Connecticut’s indigenous peoples from the first settlement to the present day?



Dr. Lucianne Lavin, Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies, drew on exciting new archaeological and ethnographic discoveries, interviews with Native Americans, and rare documents for her new book Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples - What Archaeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures. The book creates a fascinating and remarkably detailed portrait of indigenous peoples before European contact and of their changing lives during the past 400 years. Join Dr. Lavin and learn about how and why she wrote the book as well as some of the intriguing histories and cultural characteristics of Connecticut’s indigenous peoples upon which it is based. A question and answer session will follow.

There will be copies of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples - What Archaeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us About Their Communities and Their Cultures available for signing.



Birds of Bafflin Sanctuary
Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, May 31, 9 am to 11 am
Pomfret, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Spring is an exciting time to explore the various bird habitats at the Connecticut Audubon Society’s Bafflin Sanctuary. Join naturalist and science educator Paula Coughlin for a morning walk through the grasslands, forests, and wetlands of Bafflin Sanctuary to observe breeding birds singing, nesting, and raising their chicks. Bring binoculars and a water bottle, and dress for protection from ticks. Adult and child-sized binoculars will be available for loan during this family friendly activity. Participants are welcome to explore the sanctuary on their own after the program.




New Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns–Durham!
Sarah Atwell, Durham Historical Society
Saturday, June 14, 10 am to 12 noon
Durham, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The natural and cultural history of Connecticut, in each of its 169 towns, has a unique story to tell. From the indigenous peoples arriving after the glaciers receded and the European explorers and settlers establishing colonies in the “New World,” to the innovators of the industrial revolution leading to the present day, Connecticut is steeped in history. Join us as we explore Connecticut’s towns and learn about the people and places that have shaped and continue to shape the Constitution State.

The second town in the series is Durham, a historic Connecticut Valley farming town and traveling post. Settled by ambitious residents of Guilford and Killingworth in 1699, Durham was originally called the Plantation of Coginchaug, an Algonquin word meaning “long swamp.” Incorporated and renamed Durham in 1708, the town’s location on the shortest inland route between New York and Boston brought many significant people and events. Some of the most notable historic figures from Durham are Phineas Lyman, a major general during the French and Indian War, and Moses Austin and his son Stephen, the founder of Texas. Durham’s Historical District surrounding the Durham Green is one of the most well-preserved surveys of late 19th century New England architecture. Of course, Durham’s prestige as a farming community has only grown throughout history–the famous Durham Fair is now in its 95th year and attracts over 200,000 people.

Join Sarah Atwell from the Durham Historical Society and explore Durham’s historic Town Green, Main Street, and Old Cemetery. Tour sites will include the Durham Library, the second lending library established in the colonies, and the rediscovered Mill Bridge that linked the New Haven and Hartford stage coach route. The Old Cemetery has hundreds of brownstone markers, many from the historic Portland Brownstone Quarries, with the oldest marker dating back to 1712. The total walking tour is about one mile and may be challenging for some. Parts of the Old Cemetery are on steep and bumpy terrain.



Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday
Sunday, June 15, 10 am to 4 pm
Elizabeth Park, Hartford

Stop by and visit the Museum and Archaeology Center at the Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday and learn about natural and cultural history through our ethnobotany exhibit! This event celebrates the park's 15,000 blooming roses in America's oldest municipal rose garden. Explore the world famous rose garden, a two and a half acre park that has about 800 varieties of roses. There will be a number of cultural, arts, and heritage organizations participating as well as music and dance performances, and children's activities! For more information and directions visit http://elizabethparkct.org.

Member Event: Special Connecticut River and Historic House Tour
Staff, Connecticut River Museum
Saturday, June 21, 9 am to 12 noon
Essex, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $20 for Museum members
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Museum Members are invited to join us for a special event at the Connecticut River Museum. Discover the heritage of New England's Great River as you explore the museum and enjoy a cruise on the River aboard the historic schooner Mary E. A guided tour of the museum galleries will feature the special exhibition Star Spangled Nation and a tour of the historic Samuel Lay House. The Connecticut River Museum has recently acquired the Lay House and is in the process of researching the site and planning for its reinterpretation. The schooner sail will be led by the River Museum’s environmental educator and will take you through the beautiful lower tidal river.

This event is just one example of the benefits of being a member of the Museum and Archaeology Center. Join today and become part of the membership family at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center!

Interested in attending this event but don’t wish to become a member? Sign up to be on our waiting list–we will contact you if we have cancellations or open space. Fee for non-members (space permitting): $28. Please call 860.486.4460 for more information and to be added to the waiting list.



What We Can Learn from Old Gravestones: Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground
Ruth Shapleigh-Brown, Connecticut Gravestone Network
Saturday, June 28, 10 am to 12 noon
Hartford, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Historic cemeteries are found throughout Connecticut, their old gravestones offering clues about the lives of people who helped establish our present-day communities. Who carved these old stones, where did they come from, what does their symbolism mean, and how did that symbolism change over time?

Join Ruth Shapleigh-Brown, Executive Director of the Connecticut Gravestone Network, and discover what old gravestones reveal about our history. Learn what genealogists should know when looking for their ancestors’ burial places—all is not as it appears. You will never look at history and old cemeteries in the same way again. The program will begin with a presentation, and will be followed by a hike exploring Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, the oldest historic site in Hartford, which dates back to the 1600s.



Marine Explorers
K.A.S.E.T. - Kids Are Scientists & Engineers Too!
Session 1: Monday, June 30 through Wednesday, July 2, 9 am to 12 noon*
Session 2: Monday, July 7 through Wednesday, July 9, 9 am to 12 noon*
UConn, Storrs Campus and Groton Avery Point Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $185 ($165 if registered before June 7)
To register contact K.A.S.E.T. at 860.486.8115 or visit http://www.kaset.uconn.edu.

Investigate how aquatic plants and animals adapt to their environment during two mornings of activities in Storrs. On the third day, take a full-day trip to Project Oceanology at Avery Point for a lab with live animals followed by an afternoon exploring Long Island Sound aboard a research vessel. *This is a 3-day module: 2 mornings and one full-day field trip.


Space Astronomy
K.A.S.E.T. - Kids Are Scientists & Engineers Too!
Monday, July 7 through Friday, July 11, 9 am to 12 noon*
UConn, Storrs Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $185 ($165 if registered before June 7)
To register contact K.A.S.E.T. at 860.486.8115 or visit http://www.kaset.uconn.edu.

Celebrate over 400 years of telescopic astronomy by building your own small telescope and learning what’s to be seen in the night sky. We’ll also track planets, a comet and one of the largest asteroids, make and test sundials and a moondial, explore Mars using the latest NASA software, and make an iMovie of you flying around a planet of your choice. In addition to activities in UConn’s Planetarium and astronomy labs, you’ll get to use a telescope at the night observing sessions, and observe sunspots if available. *This module includes night observing sessions. Presented by the Department of Physics, part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UConn.



Archaeology Field School for Kids
K.A.S.E.T. - Kids Are Scientists & Engineers Too!
Monday, July 7 through Friday, July 11, 9 am to 12 noon
UConn, Storrs Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $185 ($165 if registered before June 7)
To register contact K.A.S.E.T. at 860.486.8115 or visit http://www.kaset.uconn.edu.

Do you like uncovering evidence to solve mysteries? Do you like the idea of getting your hands dirty while exploring the past? Spend a week with UConn archaeologists exploring the world of field archaeology. You will learn about the science, tools, and methods used by genuine archaeologists and be part of a real archaeological field crew! Participants will be doing hands-on fieldwork and laboratory research at a professional, ongoing archaeological dig. We have been opening new areas of our on-campus dig site each year, and every session we uncover something new! Presented by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center, part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UConn.


Brooklyn Botanic Garden & Brooklyn Museum, NYC
Saturday, July 12
Advance registration required: Bus Fee $45 ($35 for Museum members)
Departing from UConn Storrs Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
All ages are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Founded in 1910, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden today represents the very best in urban gardening and horticultural display and over 10,000 taxa of plants can be found within its 52 acres. Gardens Within the Garden include the Cherry Esplanade, Children’s Garden, Fragrance Garden, Herb Garden, Lily Pool Terrace, Native Flora Garden, and Rock Garden to name a few. The conservatory contains the Aquatic House, Desert Pavilion, Tropical Pavilion, Warm Temperate Pavilion, and renowned Bonsai Tree Museum.

Adjacent to the Botanic Garden you will find the Brooklyn Museum, one of the oldest and largest art museums in the country. Its world-renowned permanent collections range from ancient Egyptian masterpieces to contemporary art, and represent a wide range of cultures from across the globe.

The bus will leave Storrs at 8 am and make a second pick-up in Cromwell at 8:45 am. The bus will depart Brooklyn for UConn at 5 pm. Please arrive and be prepared to board the bus prior to departure times. Admission to the Museum and Botanic Garden are not included and should be paid at the door. Both offer a discounted “Art and Garden Ticket” to visit both venues. For a preview, and prices for admission packages, visit the Brooklyn Botanic Garden website at http://www.bbg.org and the Brooklyn Museum website at http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/home.php.


Personal Fieldnotes: Documenting the World Around You
Megan Delaney, Museum of Natural History, UConn
Saturday, July 19, 10 am to 12 noon
Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs
Advance registration required: $25 ($20 for Museum members); includes materials fee
Adults and children ages 12 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

From Greek memory aids, Renaissance commonplace books, and Victorian albums to scientific fieldnotes and modern day scrapbooks, the practice of documenting memory and personal experience has existed for centuries. Join us for a workshop on how to start your own collection of experiences. In this workshop, participants will learn about the various forms, uses, and terminology for this wide-ranging activity, with an emphasis on documenting the natural world. Participants will have the opportunity to look through the amazing archaeological fieldnotes created by John Spaulding, which inspired our current exhibit Thinking Like an Archaeologist. Then, we will introduce the tools and materials typically used in paper crafting and teach some basic tips and techniques for laying out photos and ephemera. You will receive a folder that contains instructions, basic supplies such as solid and patterned paper, adhesives, and embellishments, and a list of other helpful supplies to create your own fieldnote kit at home. Please bring items (such as photos, found items from your yard, or other ephemera) that you are interested in including in your own personal fieldnotes.



Magnificent Microbes! 
K.A.S.E.T. - Kids Are Scientists & Engineers Too!
Monday, July 21 through Friday, July 25, 9 am to 12 noon
UConn, Storrs Campus (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $185 ($165 if registered before June 7)
To register contact K.A.S.E.T. at 860.486.8115 or visit http://www.kaset.uconn.edu.

Explore unseen worlds that are all around you. Discover microscopic organisms that make your food good, and those that make your food go bad. Learn how yeasts make bread, and bacteria make yogurt, and find out how to keep your kitchen clean from the microbes that can make you sick. Trek outside and hunt for microbes in lawns, ponds and woods! See the colorful microbes that live in ponds, create rust, and help plants to grow. Uncover the microbes that help termites to eat wood. Find microbes that defend themselves with antibiotics. Join us and open your eyes to an exciting new world! Presented by the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, and Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UConn.


Project O—Fun in the Lab and On the Sea!
Research Staff, Project Oceanology, UConn Avery Point
Saturday, July 26, 10 am to 3:30 pm
Groton, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $40 ($30 for Museum members)
Fee includes both the morning workshop and afternoon cruise.
Adults and children ages 6 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please register early as space is limited.

Spend the day on the Connecticut shoreline, experiencing marine science both onshore and at sea. You will be in the Project Oceanology laboratory in the morning to explore the natural history and diversity of Long Island Sound’s animal and plant life through fun, hands-on activities. After the lunch break, you'll go out to sea on the Enviro-lab II research vessel. During this 2.5-hour cruise on Long Island Sound, you will experience hands-on marine biology at the stern of the boat by pulling trawl and plankton nets, and then examining the catch. At the bow, learn chemistry and physics through scientific experimentation as you operate the instruments and equipment used in oceanography to study the characteristics of seawater. Bring a picnic lunch to eat by the harbor’s edge!


Protecting Trees from Asian Longhorn Beetles and Emerald Ash Borers
Katherine Dugas, Entomologist
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
Saturday, August 2, 10 am

Connecticut State Museum of Natural History, UConn Storrs

No registration required – FREE

Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.



The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) and Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) are two invasive forest pests that threaten Connecticut’s urban and rural forests. While the Asian Longhorned Beetle has not yet been found in CT, it is in Worcester MA (35 miles from the CT border). The Emerald Ash Borer was first detected in CT in July 2012, and has since been found in 15 towns spanning the four westernmost counties of CT. The rapid spread of both of these forest pests can be prevented by limiting the long-distance movement of firewood.

Join Katherine Dugas, from the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, and learn about the history and biology of Asian Longhorn Beetles and Emerald Ash Borers, current survey methods, host tree identification, control and eradication efforts for both insects, and ways that the public can help to detect and prevent the spread of these and other destructive forest pests. Then step outside as we identity and examine some of the host trees found around the Museum.

CSMNH Adult Archaeology Field School
Dr. Nicholas Bellantoni, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, August 4 through Friday, August 8, 9 am to 3 pm
Central Connecticut location (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $400 ($300 for Museum members)
Adults and teens ages 16 and above.

Spend an entire week learning about archaeology at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center’s Field School! This intensive field school will cover the cultural aspects of archaeology, as well as proper archaeological field techniques and data management. As a member of this program, you will have the opportunity to participate in a dig at an archaeological site as part of the official team of investigators under the Office of State Archaeology. Your findings will add important information to our understanding of Connecticut’s rich historic past!

Hammonasset Shoreline Ecosystems
Meigs Point Nature Center Staff, Hammonasset State Park
Thursday August 14, 10 am to 11:30 am, rain or shine
Madison, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $10 ($5 for Museum members);
parking fees are not included.
All ages are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Explore the ecosystems of Connecticut’s coast at Hammonasset State Park. Adjacent to Long Island Sound, in the shoreline town of Madison, the ecosystems of Hammonasset are swimming with life. From its sandy beach and rocky shore, to its salt marshes, Connecticut’s largest shoreline park is not only popular with beach-goers, but also a diverse collection of plants and animals that call this shoreline environment home. Join the Meigs Point Nature Center Staff and discover the characteristics of three ecosystems found at Hammonasset State Park. Once the tour has been completed, enjoy the rest of the afternoon at this beautiful seaside setting. Bring appropriate footwear, such as boots or old sneakers, that can get wet and muddy.

High Tech Treasure Hunting: Fun with GPS and Geocaching
Cary Chadwick, Extension Educator, Center for Land Use Education and Research (CLEAR), UConn
Saturday, August 23, 10 am to 12 noon
East Haddam, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $20 ($15 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Originally, the Global Positioning System (GPS) was developed for military use as a navigational aid. Today, the general public has access to this satellite-based technology, and using hand-held GPS devices they can participate in geocaching, a high-tech treasure hunt. The idea behind geocaching is to locate outdoor hidden containers, called geocaches, by using GPS coordinates listed on the Geocaching website, and then share your experiences with others online. Currently, there are 2,302,719 active geocaches and over 6 million participants worldwide!

Cary Chadwick of UConn’s Center for Land Use Education and Research will teach you how to use a handheld GPS unit. Then, everyone will go outdoors and hunt for practice caches using the coordinates given to you. One of these will be an officially registered geocache that you can list online as your first. Join us for this opportunity to learn about this fun-filled combination of hiking and treasure hunting, high tech style!



Special Trip: Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village, Avella, PA
Friday, October 10 through Sunday, October 12
Advance registration required: $325 (double room) or $420 (single room)
Adults and children ages 12 and above. Participants under 18
must be accompanied by an adult.

The 16,000-year-old Meadowcroft Rockshelter is the earliest known site of continuous human habitation in North America! Property owner and museum founder, Albert Miller, discovered the first prehistoric artifacts found at Meadowcroft in 1955. In 1973, the first professional excavation of the Rockshelter was conducted by the Cultural Resource Management Program (CRMP) of the University of Pittsburgh and directed by Dr. James M. Adovasio. Today, ongoing research and excavation continues under the direction of Dr. Adovasio through the Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute (MAI). The excavation protocols used at Meadowcroft are considered state-of-the-art and widely regarded as one of the most carefully excavated archaeological sites. Don’t miss this special opportunity to explore this National Historic Landmark and Meadowcroft Village, which recreates an Upper Ohio Valley village from the mid-19th century.

The fee includes round trip bus transportation (gratuity included), two nights’ accommodations at Hilton Garden Inn, two upgraded full breakfast buffets, entrance to the Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village, boxed lunches during the Meadowcroft Rockshelter visit, and a tour led by Dr. James M. Adovasio of the Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute (MAI).

This trip is sponsored by the Friends of the Office of State Archaeology (FOSA) and
the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center at UConn. Advance registration with full payment is required by August 1, 2014. To request a Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village trip registration form, please contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.