Register and pay for your programs online, or download a printable
registration form and mail it to the Museum with your payment.

May
Ancient Technologies Workshop: Flint Knapping, Saturday May 19

June
Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Life & Times of Charles Darwin, Saturday, June 9
Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday, Sunday, June 17

July
Archaeology Field School for Kids, Monday, July 9 - Friday, July 13
Archaeology Field School for Educators, Monday, July 16 - Friday, July 20
Archaeology Field School for Vets & Active Duty Military, Monday, July 23 - Fri, July 27
Special All-Ages Event: UConn Bug Week - AntU Day! Thursday, July 26
UConn Bug Week Event, Saturday, July 28
CSMNH Archaeology Field School for Adults, Monday, July 30 - Friday, August 3

August
Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Darwin & Women, Saturday, August 11
Special Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns – Middletown! Saturday, August 25

September
Mysterious Mushrooms, Saturday, September 8

Ancient Technologies Workshop: Flint Knapping
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, Museum of Natural History, UConn

Scott Brady, Friends of the Office of State Archaeology
Saturday May 19, 1 pm to 3 pm – UConn, Storrs, CT
Adults and children ages 14 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 
Advance registration required: $50 (includes material fee).

Flint knapping is the production of stone tools with sharp edges created by percussion and pressure. This technology was used by all societies before the introduction of metal working. Stone was traditionally used to make spear and dart points, arrow heads, knives, scrapers, blades and many other tools. It was also used in historic times to manufacture gun flints. You may have seen these stone artifacts exhibited in museums—now is your chance to make and use them! Artifacts from the collections of the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History will be examined and discussed as well. Discover the history and art of flint knapping and learn how archaeologists identify and date these tools. Work gloves are recommended as the knapped stones are sharp.


Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Life and Times of Charles Darwin
Saturday, June 9, 10 am – Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn, Storrs, CT
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 

Charles Darwin lived during a tumultuous time in England and the world. Born as England was losing its largest colony, he grew up as the industrial revolution was getting started. Society was breaking into new classes and new rules were governing the relationship between those classes were being forged out of social strife. England gained control of the seas and an empire was being built. The reign of Queen Vitoria saw new social mores come into play. Within all this, a new natural historian, or scientist as they were beginning to be called, was developing ideas that would be influenced by and impact many of these societal developments. Charles Darwin and his evolution theories were a product of his times. This presentation will explore Darwin’s relation to many of these topics including political movements, poor laws, religious doctrines, slavery, vivisection, and spiritualism. Join us for this exploration of Darwin’s world. Mr. Darwin will be portrayed by professor Kenneth Noll of UConn’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology.

Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday
Sunday, June 17, 10 am to 4 pm – Elizabeth Park, Hartford, CT

Stop by and visit the Museum’s table at the Elizabeth Park Conservancy's Rose Sunday and learn about natural and cultural history! This event celebrates the park's 15,000 blooming roses in America's oldest municipal rose garden. Explore the world famous rose garden, a two and a half acre park that has about 800 varieties of roses. There will be a number of cultural, arts, and heritage organizations participating as well as performing arts and children's activities! For more information and directions visit http://elizabethparkct.org.



Archaeology Field School for Kids
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, UConn
Monday, July 9 through Friday, July 13, 9 am to 12 noon UConn, Storrs
Advance registration required: $200
Grades 5 through 10.

Do you like uncovering evidence to solve mysteries? Do you like getting your hands dirty exploring the outdoors? Spend a week exploring the world of field archaeology with Connecticut State Archaeologist Brian Jones, PhD. You will learn about the science, tools, and methods used by genuine archaeologists and be part of a real archaeological field crew. Participants will be doing hands-on fieldwork and laboratory research at a professional archaeological dig at UConn.



Archaeology Field School for Educators
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, UConn
Monday, July 16 through Friday, July 20, 9 am to 3 pm, Windsor, CT
Advance registration required: $50

Educators will spend a week doing hands-on archaeology at the Archaeology Field School for Educators sponsored by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Office of State Archaeology. This field school is designed to give educators who teach history or social science in a classroom or museum setting a deeper appreciation of the importance of archaeology as a tool for learning about Connecticut’s fascinating past. The field school will cover the basics of field methods, paperwork, data management, and artifact identification. Learning proper archaeological methods will develop the participant’s understanding of the ethical aspects of archaeology and the archaeologist’s responsibility to preserve the data they retrieve so that it will remain valuable to future researchers. These lessons provide a first step toward developing the skills needed to undertake your own archaeological investigations with students. 

Participants will experience an authentic archaeological investigation, working with primary sources at a historic site in Windsor, Connecticut. They will also learn about the role of the Office of State Archaeology and how it can be an important resource in developing archeological lessons and activities for students. Space is limited. To request a registration form please contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.


Archaeology Field School for Veterans and Active Duty Military Personnel
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, UConn
Monday, July 23 through Friday, July 27, 9 am to 3 pm, Windsor, CT
Advance registration required. Fee: $0.00

Veterans and active duty military personnel will spend a week doing hands-on archaeology at an Archaeology Field School sponsored by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Office of State Archaeology. The field school will cover the basics of field methods, paperwork, data management, and artifact identification. Learning proper archaeological methods will develop the participant’s understanding of the ethical aspects of archaeology and the archaeologist’s responsibility to preserve the data they retrieve so that it will remain valuable to future researchers.

Participants will have the opportunity to experience an official Office of State Archaeology dig at a historic site in Windsor, Connecticut. Space is limited. To request a registration form please contact David Colberg at david.colberg@uconn.edu or 860.486.5690.


Special All-Ages Event: UConn Bug Week - AntU Day!
Thursday, July 26, Noon-4 pm
Biology/Physics Building, Lobby Level, UConn Storrs campus
No registration required – FREE
 
‘Be Our Guest’ at the Biology/Physics building and UConn Greenhouses for this year’s exciting AntU Day!  Check out the exhibit and our giant 12-foot ant, take part in fun all-ages activities (with giveaways), and learn about our progress in the Army Ant Guest NSF project. During this unique afternoon, you can also visit the Biodiversity Research Collections, take a tour of the EEB Greenhouses, see a live fungus-growing ant colony, and get some special ‘Ant’ topped Dairy Bar ice cream!
 
This event is free and open to the public. Groups are encouraged to attend, with bus parking available! For updates and more information, email antuinfo@uconn.edu or visit our website at antu.uconn.edu
 
UConn Extension Bug Week is a College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources annual event. Extension is offering many amazing Bug Week programs this year. See the entire line-up at: http://bugs.uconn.edu/


UConn Bug Week
Department of Extension, UConn
Saturday, July 28, 10 am to 1 pm – Tolland County Extension Center, Vernon, CT

Discover the wonderful world of bugs at this UConn Bug Week event. There will be live insect specimens, expert led walks, visits to the pollinator and butterfly garden as well as the woods. Stop by the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History’s table to see a variety of insect specimens from its natural history collection. For additional Bug Week information visit http://bugs.uconn.edu



CSMNH Archaeology Field School for Adults
Dr. Brian Jones, State Archaeologist, CSMNH UConn
Monday, July 30 through Friday, August 3, 9 am to 3 pm – Glastonbury, CT
Advance registration required: $250

Spend a week learning about archaeology at the Connecticut State Museum of Natural History and Connecticut Archaeology Center’s Field School! This field school will cover the ethical aspects of archaeology, as well as proper archaeological field techniques and data management. As a member of this program, you will have the opportunity to participate in an official Connecticut Office of State Archaeology dig. The dig will take place at a recently discovered and very significant site dating to the mid to late 1600s. Your findings will add important information to our understanding of Connecticut’s rich historic past!



Morning Tea with Mr. Darwin: Darwin and Women
Saturday, August 11, 10 am – Biology/Physics Building, Room 130, UConn, Storrs, CT
No registration required – FREE
Adults and children ages 10 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 

Mr. Darwin was a man of his times. By today’s standards, his thinking and actions would not be tolerated. Even in his own day, there were some men, including his older brother Erasmus, who’s attitudes were more modern. He was quite charming around women and those close to him loved him very much. His attitudes about women’s place in society developed through a combination of his upbringing and his study of the differences between the sexes in nature. He was the first to suggest that Natural Selection sometimes manifested itself among animals in the form of what he called Sexual Selection. The female animal frequently chose the male based on his apparent suitability for siring healthy, competitive offspring. He thought that humans did the same thing as a result of their animal nature. Of course, Victorian mores came into play in his thinking as well. This presentation will explore all these features of his life as well as describe the changing roles of women in Victorian England. Join us for this exploration of Darwin’s world. Mr. Darwin will be portrayed by professor Kenneth Noll of UConn’s Department of Molecular and Cell Biology.



Special Series: Exploring Connecticut’s Towns – Middletown!
Deborah Shapiro Executive Director, Middlesex County Historical Society
Saturday, August 25, 10 am to 11:30 am, Middletown, CT
Advance registration required. $15 per person.
Adults and children ages 8 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

The natural and cultural history of Connecticut, in each of its 169 towns, has a unique story to tell. From the indigenous peoples arriving after the glaciers receded and the European explorers and settlers establishing colonies in the “New World,” to the innovators of the industrial revolution leading to the present day, Connecticut is steeped in history. Join us as we explore Connecticut’s towns and learn about the people and places that have shaped and continue to shape the Constitution State.

Located along the Connecticut River, Middletown was initially incorporated under its Native American name Mattabeseck in 1650, before receiving its present name in 1653. Originally a busy sailing port and then industrial center, today Middletown is residential city with a thriving downtown area filled with unique restaurants and shops.

Participants will first tour the exhibit “A Vanished Port: Middletown & the Caribbean, 1750-1824” at the Middlesex County Historical Society. It is a portrait of early Middletown, which was an important port during the heyday of the West Indies trade. The exhibit depicts the luxurious life of merchants and sea captains as evidenced by the Society’s furniture and decorative arts collections, but also shows that Middletown’s prosperity rested on the suffering of enslaved workers in the sugar monoculture of the English Caribbean.

Following the exhibit, the group will walk along Main Street to the South Green and other points of interest where guide Deborah Shapiro, the executive director of the Historical Society, will talk about other aspects of Middletown’s history including its participation in the Civil War and emergence as a manufacturing center in the industrial revolution. Middletown was also active in the Abolitionist Movement and the home of Benjamin Douglas, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, will be pointed out.


Mysterious Mushrooms
Connie Borodenko, Connecticut Valley Mycological Society
Saturday, September 8, 10 am to 11:30 am – eastern, CT
Advance registration required: $20

Discover the startling, colorful, sometimes delicious, and sometimes deadly, world of mushrooms and fungi with mycologist Connie Borodenko. Mushrooms are fungi usually found growing on soil or decaying matter. The mushroom is the fruiting body of mycelium, which is usually hidden underground or throughout the host that it is growing on. Participants will seek out edible mushrooms such as the sweet Chanterelles, spicy trumpets, slippery honeys and, Hen of the Woods. Identifying dangerous and nonedible mushrooms such as the deadly Destroying Angel and Death Cap will also be explored.

Bring a basket and paper bags for gathering these denizens of the shadows during the first part of the program. Then learn about the fascinating world of fungi, collection techniques, and important safety considerations as we discuss the findings with our mushroom expert. This hike may be challenging for some and will include hilly areas.

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